Truman-Albright Fellows Program

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Stay in the nation's capitol following Summer Institute and be a part of this inspiring yearlong program. The Truman-Albright Fellows Program will take place from September to May of each year and is only open to recent graduates who have already won a Truman Scholarship.

Each Fellow should be employed in an entry level position by a public service organization and will have the opportunity to participate in both an educational and service component throughout the year in Washington DC. Organizations that have hosted Fellows in recent years include:

·       Appalachian Regional Commission

·       Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

·       Department of Agriculture—Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

·       Department of Agriculture—Office of Rural Development

·       Department of Education

·       Department of Health and Human Services—Administration for Children and Families

·       Department of Health and Human Services—Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

·       Department of Health and Human Services—Office of Rural Health Policy

·       Department of Homeland Security—United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

·       Department of Housing and Urban Development

·       Department of Interior—Bureau of Indian Affairs

·       Department of Transportation—Office of the Secretary

·       Department of Veterans Affairs

·       Human Rights Campaign

·       Institute for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown University 

·       Office of Leader Nancy Palosi (D-CA)

·       Office of U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV)

·       Office of U.S. Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA)

·       Office of U.S. Senator Rand Paul (R-KY)

·       Pew Charitable Trusts

·       US Supreme Court

·       White House - Office of Management and Administration

·       Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 

What follows are the names and bios for the 2017-2018 Truman-Albright Fellows: 

Jason Arterburn (AL 14) is an analyst at C4ADS, an organization that uses novel analytics techniques and software applications to do cutting edge, high impact reporting and policy advising on transnational security issues. Jason is interested in how emerging technology is changing the global security environment. He earned a BA in economics from the University of Alabama and an MA in China studies from Peking University, where he used Mandarin to write and defend a thesis on blockchain technology and the Chinese carbon market. Previously, he interned in the Asia Program at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, in the Office of Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, and at the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Jason sits on the Board of Directors for Birmingham to Beijing, a 501(c)(3) organization that provides high-achieving students at low-income high schools in Alabama with Mandarin language classes and a study tour in China. Jason is a two-time state champion gymnast, and in his free time, he likes playing sports, binge watching Game of Thrones, and planning his next trip abroad.

Rashaun Bennett (NC 15) is completing his second year at the U.S Department of Health and Human Services where he works as a policy analyst within the Division of Economic Support for Families. His position has allowed him to examine what tools the federal government uses to solve issues of homelessness, opioid abuse, domestic violence and employment issues around the nation. Rashaun hopes to pursue a JD and advanced policy degree with a particular focus on the intersection between economic development and housing in urban areas. 

Michael Beyer (LA 15) is a recent graduate of Louisiana State University where he majored in Political Science as well as minoring in Women’s and Gender Studies and Philosophy. He previously worked as an organizer for the Hillary Clinton campaign in 2016 in New Hampshire and has interned at GLSEN, the Center for American Progress, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). As a Fellow at YI Advisors, Michael hopes to bring his experience in research, policy, and organizing to improve the health, education, and well-being of young people.

Lia Cattaneo (VA 15) graduated from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a double major in Civil & Environmental Engineering and Environmental Sciences. In her current role as a Policy Analyst in the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation, Lia focuses on improving the environmental and community impacts of transportation. Though a recent grad, Lia has already worked in government, academia, nonprofits, and the private sector, using research to advance action on climate change in the United States and abroad. While in school, she founded and led several sustainability organizations and helped to pass the world’s first nitrogen footprint reduction goal. Passionate about both public service and figure skating, Lia volunteers with a nonprofit skating rink in D.C. that primarily serves low-income residents. Lia also skates for DC Edge Synchronized Skating Team, which won the 2017 national championships. 

Adam Cohen (ME 15) is a Policy and Program Associate at Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future (SAHF), a collaborative of 13 non-profit affordable housing developers focused on multifamily rental housing. He has held past positions with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Philadelphia City Planning Commission, and Community Housing of Maine. Adam graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2016 with a degree in Urban Studies. He hopes to return to Maine to attend law school and practice housing and community development law.

Alfred Delena (NM 15) is from the Pueblo of Zuni Indian Reservation and is an enrolled member of the Zuni Tribe. In 2016, Alfred graduated from Stanford University with a Bachelor’s degree in Human Biology and a Minor in Education with honors. As an undergrad, Alfred focused his time and energy on fusing his multiple, interdisciplinary interests which include public service, psychology, addressing educational and health disparities, resilience and well-being, human development, mindset, mindfulness, youth empowerment, Native and Indigenous representation, research, and community engagement. To highlight a few, he served as a Camp Kesem counselor, taught learners in a primary school in Cape Town, South Africa, and wrote his senior thesis on the lived experiences of mental health among first-generation, low-income, undergraduate students of color at Stanford. Since graduating, he has interned for a social impact organization in Palo Alto, CA and prior to his move to DC, he was an assistant Track and Field coach with Zuni High School Thunderbirds. Currently, he works in the Policy Research Division in the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy (FORHP). Embedded within the greater U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, FORHP collaborates with rural communities and partners to support programs and shape policy that will improve health in rural America.

Jessica Depies (NM 16) graduated magna cum laude with a BA in Economics and International Relations from Boston University in 2017. Her senior honors thesis built on research she conducted as a Boren Scholar in Northeastern Brazil, examining the relationship between environmental and social protections in Brazil's informal settlements. She will continue this research through a Fulbright Research Grant in 2018. During her undergraduate career, Jessica interned for the Political Office of the U.S. Embassy in Lima, Peru; served as Assistant Program Director of a nonprofit providing debate education in low-income Boston schools; organized events and educational programming at Boston University's Community Service Center; and co-founded a community of student groups dedicated to global development at BU. She plans to work in global development policy in order to alleviate global poverty by prioritizing grassroots voices and rigorous research. She interned at the World Bank Inspection Panel during the summer of 2017 and is continuing this work as a Truman-Albright Fellow through the end of 2017.

Jill Ferguson (VA 16) graduated with high honors from the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science as the Outstanding Student of 2017. She earned a B.S. in Engineering Science with a concentration in Material Science and Nanotechnology Engineering and a minor in Business. Jill makes it her life's work to help establish and implement the policies that promote renewable energy as a major part of the solution to get greenhouse gas emissions under control and atmospheric carbon levels to sustainable, healthy levels. She has conducted solar photovoltaic research at MIT, worked for the U.S. Department of Energy, and has spoken at The White House about STEM education. She volunteers in K-12 STEM outreach and helps organize the annual TechConnect National Student Network Nanotechnology Conference. She currently works at the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy and hopes to pursue a Masters in Technology Policy at MIT.

Thomas G. Roberts (MN 15), of Morris, Minnesota, is a research assistant and program coordinator at the Center for Strategic & International Studies' (CSIS) Aerospace Security Project. His research focuses on civil and commercial space, space security, and international relations in science. Thomas graduated from Princeton University with a B.A. in Astrophysical Sciences and an undergraduate certificate in Russian language. Outside of his research at CSIS, Thomas enjoys giving tours of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum as a volunteer docent and writing and producing podcasts with his housemates.

Kate Hamilton (DC 15) is the Press Secretary for Rep. Peter Welch (D-VT). She completed her BA in Political Science at Middlebury College, graduating summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa. Previously, she worked as an ad writer on the Hillary for America media team, as a field organizer for President Obama's 2012 reelection campaign, and as an intern in the Obama White House. 

Jed Hanson (ND 16) is a staff assistant in the office of U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp. He previously interned with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's Office of Enforcement, Senator Heitkamp, and a local legislative race. He graduated cum laude from the University of North Dakota with a BS in Public Administration and a BS in Political Science. While in college, he took leadership in local Democratic politics, focusing his efforts on youth voter protection, education, and turnout. He is passionate about the future of infrastructure, ranging from transportation to telecommunications. He intends to use his time in the Senate to gain legislative experience in preparation for a Masters of Public Policy.

Annie Himes (NE 15), of Omaha, Nebraska, recently returned from Saratov, Russia, where she worked as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant at Saratov State University during the 2016-2017 academic year. She is now working as a Junior Fellow in the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. In 2016, Annie graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she majored in Russian, Global Studies, and History with minors in Spanish, English, Political Science, Women's and Gender Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs. In her free time, Annie enjoys drinking good coffee, trying new foods, and reading fiction to distract from distressing NYT push notifications. 

Teresa Danali Kennedy (AK 15) is a Yukon transport, hailing from the State of Alaska and currently residing in Washington, D.C. After receiving a B.S. in English Literature from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2016, Teresa Danali moved to the capitol to pursue the intersection of entrepreneurship, human rights, and civic engagement. In her most recent role at the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce, she managed programs supporting small-owned LGBT business enterprises and local LGBT chambers of commerce across the nation. Her previous experiences include interning for the Bureau of Populations, Refugees, and Migration at the Department of State, and creating an annual symposium at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum for service academy student research. Teresa Danali enjoys traveling with her partner, camping, diner-diving, and playing her violin. 

Andrew Lubash (OR 14) graduated magna cum laude from the University of Oregon’s Robert D. Honors College, majoring in economics and political science. At the UO, Andrew was a board member for multiple state and national student advocacy organizations that work to make higher education more affordable and accessible, especially for traditionally marginalized communities. Andrew also served as a student senator advocating for increased sexual violence prevention programming on campus. His thesis investigated the political implications surrounding Oregon’s recent higher education governance restructuring and won the Bennett Award for best political science honors thesis. Andrew has worked as a paralegal at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau where he assisted in enforcing federal consumer finance laws. Currently, he serves as the Development & Communications Manager for the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation. 

Victoria Maloch (AR 16) is a summa cum laude graduate of the University of Arkansas where she studied agricultural business, communications, and leadership. Long active in government and policy, she has held internships at the U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the White House. During college, Victoria was elected as a national officer for the National FFA Organization. In this role, a position requiring more than 100,000 miles of travel and 300 days on the road, she represented the organization and supported its vision of growing leaders, building healthy local communities, and strengthening American agriculture. Currently, Victoria is a Truman-Albright Fellow in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's Federal Office of Rural Health Policy. Upon completion of the fellowship, she will pursue a graduate education focusing on the various cultural, social, and economic challenges of policy implementation in rural America.

Grace May (TN 15), of Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, graduated from Georgetown University in 2016 with a B.A. in Government. She currently serves as a Truman-Albright Fellow at the Office of Policy & Strategy (OP&S) at the United States Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS). As an analyst with the Family Immigration & Victim Protection Division, her work centers on vulnerable immigrant populations, including trafficking victims, domestic violence survivors, and abandoned and abused children. She also serves on the Latin American Youth Center's Associate Board. At the Georgetown University Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching, and Service Grace managed community engagement and ELL instruction for immigrant families in D.C. She also studied systems impacting youth and families and supported juvenile justice reform projects as a research assistant with the Georgetown Community Research Group. After the Truman-Albright Fellowship, Grace plans to earn a public policy degree with a focus on understanding immigrant integration and education equity as a catalyst for social change, particularly in rural communities and the American South.

Victoria Ochoa (TX 15) is a graduate of St. Edward's University and a proud native of the Rio Grande Valley. Currently, she works at the Department of Commerce in the Secretary's Office as a Confidential Assistant to the Deputy Chiefs of Staff. Previously, she was an assistant at the University of New Mexico's Office of Government Relations and researched Latino politics at Stanford. Passionate about Texas and community engagement, Victoria also interned at Annie's List, the Texas House of Representatives, her Congressman's DC office and, the White House as a Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs intern. Throughout her career, she wants to work on issues that economically and politically empower minority communities, particularly those in Texas. She likes to run and dance to Beyoncé.

Alex Paterson (MT 15) holds a BS in Economics from Montana State University and spent the past year serving as a Truman-Albright Fellow in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. His research at HHS focused on economic self-sufficiency and workforce development. In the coming year, he will work at the Truman Foundation as the resident scholar. Outside of his lifelong goal of empowering LGBTQ youth to become the fabulous leaders they were born to be, Alex loves to dance, eat bagels, and rollerblade. 

CJ (Caleb) Pine (CO 16) graduated as valedictorian of the Class of 2017 at the University of Notre Dame with majors in Arabic and Peace Studies, and a minor in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE). CJ interned at the Department of State Office of UN Political Affairs in the Bureau of International Organization Affairs during the 2017 Summer Institute. CJ grew up for 18 years in Tianjin and Lanzhou, China, where he attended elementary school in Mandarin and was then homeschooled through high school. At university, he studied abroad for a semester in Jerusalem for spring 2015 and in Amman, Jordan for spring 2016. He is on the Board of Directors for a non-profit Road to Mafraq that raises funds to support education for Syrian and Iraqi refugees in Jordan. He also has led inter-faith advocacy for Syrian refugees and an anti-Islamophobia social media campaign at Notre Dame. CJ is motivated by religion, justice, reconciliation, refugee advocacy - and wonderful friends and family.

Emmanuel Pressley (SC 14) was raised in Hemingway, South Carolina, and graduated from Hemingway High School as the first African-American male valedictorian in June of 2011. He furthered his education to Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He has interned for the 16th Circuit Court Family Division in Kansas City, Missouri under the Honorable Martina L. Peterson and the Queens County Supreme Court in Queens, New York under the Honorable Martin E. Ritholtz and Common Cause New York. Emmanuel graduated magna cum laude from Claflin University in May of 2015 with a Bachelors of Arts in Politics and Justice Studies. He recently completed a year of service with City Year AmeriCorps teaching second grade. As a Truman-Albright Fellow, Pressley will be working at the U.S. General Service Administration in the Office Financial Acquisition Services. He plans to pursue a dual degree program obtaining his JD/PhD with aspirations of practicing law and teaching.

Zahava Urecki (WV 15) was born and raised in Charleston, West Virginia. At the age of 11, Zahava gained her passion for politics and government after watching The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report. Her fascination with government coupled with her desire to help her home state led to her tenure as an intern in the office of U.S Senator Joe Manchin (WV) during college. After four summers in the Manchin office, Zahava was hired on as a staff assistant in Senator Manchin's office where she currently works. After some time on Capitol Hill, Zahava hopes to return to West Virginia where she wants to work on issues related to Appalachian development. In particular, she hopes to help her home state to end its’ reliance on coal while finding viable solutions for coal miners affected by this transition. Zahava earned a BA in Political Science from Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia where she graduated summa cum laude and was named the senior scholar in political science. Besides being named Roanoke’s first Truman Scholar, Zahava is also a Schusterman Foundation REALITY Scholar.

Daniel Waqar (NV 15) graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and serves as a Truman-Albright Fellow at the Millennium Challenge Corporation. During Summer Institute, he worked with Executive Vice President, and former U.S. Ambassador to Israel, Martin Indyk, at the Brookings Institution on a book about Secretary Kissinger’s efforts in the 1970s Middle East peace process. After studying Arabic and peace and conflict studies in Haifa, Israel, he received the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program Scholarship to study U.S. foreign relations at Howard University in Washington D.C. He published his research honors thesis on the historic relationship of power imbalances and violence in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He also authored a white paper on the state of urban elevated expressways for Brookings Mountain West. For his research and public service accomplishments, he has won the John S. Wright and Rosemary Masek Awards for best history student and the Lance and Elena Calvert Award for Undergraduate Research.

 

If you have any questions, please email Alex Paterson at apaterson@truman.gov or call him at 202.395.7431.